climate

Global Greens Statement on ratifying the Paris Agreement

Statement by the Global Greens on the occasion of the Signing of the Paris Agreement, New York, 21 April 2016. Green parliamentarians around the world undertake to introduce in the national Parliaments, in which we are represented, domestic legislation to give practical effect to the Paris Agreement.
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Global Greens Action on Implementing the Paris Agreement

A Global Greens statement was produced to coincide with the Paris Agreement signing ceremony which took place in New York in April. The Global Greens campaign invited Green members in national parliaments to identify one fossil fuel reserve to leave in the ground and at least one fossil fuel subsidy to abolish or phase out and take legislative action accordingly. We also invited national Green Parties to submit their particular initiatives and to put out a press release on the day. No fracking said UK Caroline Lucas MP, no new coal or expanded coal or CSG said Australia’s Senator Richard Di Natale, and the complete transformation of the transport sector said German MPs. We are the only political party that is truly global in reach. It is an achievement to celebrate and a structure to use and improve. Our efforts to organise and demonstrate that we are greater than the sum of our parts is in its infancy. It reinforces our shared values and commitment when we campaign together or celebrate together Green wins on policy or in elections. But we don’t do it enough. Global outcomes need global action.
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Taking Climate Action to the Next Level: Reflections by UN Climate Chief

As the ink dries on the Paris Agreement concluded in December, the significance of the event is now being weighed up. At one and the same time, it is an ‘historic moment of hope for humanity’; it goes ‘nowhere near far enough’; and it is even a ‘fraud’. Which is correct? For Christiana Figuerres, Executive Director of UNFCC, the Agreement, “establishes a new model of 21st century diplomacy”. The global problems of the 21st century are different; they are not zero-sum; they invite the tragedy of the commons through national free-loading. If the ‘deficits’ of the Paris Agreement are also its ‘greatest strengths’ in the new form of global governance, then we are in for an exciting ride. Inviting 196 parties to save the planet rather than requiring them to do it is a nice way of playing roulette. And experience suggests that naming-and-shaming will not do it. If change does not come from governments, in the name of Paris, and within the next five years, not fifteen, then it will require the peoples of the world to revolutionise their governments – in the name of Paris.
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Case Study for an Effective Climate Contribution: 2nd post-Paris blog

Dr Kennedy Graham, MP (NZ)

The 2015 Paris outcome is going to require higher standards of behaviour from all 196 Parties to the Framework Convention.  

  • The Paris Agreement aims to ‘strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change’; Article 4 provides that “developed country Parties should continue taking the lead by undertaking economy-wide reduction targets”.

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The President’s Text: Invertebrate and Vulnerable - Kennedy Graham COP21 blog 4

The President’s text of 9 Dec. has weakened the co-chairs’ text of 5 Dec. to a dangerous degree. With mitigation, there are eight main components: purpose, long-term goal, individual effort, progression, timing, ex ante process, adjustments, and stocktake. With four of these, the text remains more or less unchanged (individual effort; progression, timing and adjustment). But in four others, the text is weakened, as is shown below.
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Climate Salvation: urgent but not yet - Kennedy Graham COP21 blog 3

Dr Kennedy Graham (MP, New Zealand), Global Greens delegate to COP-21

The new ‘text’ circulated this week at COP-21 tells the story of our global drama.  The ‘Ad Hoc Working Group for Enhanced Action’ has submitted the text to the Conference of the Parties which is now required to deliberate and adopt it.  This is jargon for ‘the diplomatic grouping responsible for the future of Earth’.

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Domestic Workers and Climate Change

The main problems that drag women to become workers abroad, especially as domestic workers, are due to limited living space caused by massive expansion of big plantations, such as palm, pulp paper, or any other big investment. ... For the sake of economic growth, local communities are imposed upon to follow the capital owner's homogenisation of commodities such as agricultural conversation to palm, pesticide use, and modern life. Political, economic, and cultural benefits are often not acquired by the society. We have lost so much in the name of this big investment. We have lost our rights as the sovereign holder of food, land, water, energy, and other natural resources.
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Messages for Ministers

Increasing the level of ambition will require trust and cooperation that has been sorely lacking in negotiations over the past 23 years. It is essential that countries abide by the spirit of the agreement without trying to twist the rules for their own advantage. That means there need to be clear rules and definitions, and strong accountability mechanisms. These next few days are crucial. We need politicians to step up and elevate their vision beyond the interests of polluters and their short term commercial interests. Green Party members from across all continents are in Paris to help make this happen, supported by our members and voters.
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Strengthening Local Community Initiatives to Oppose Exploitation of Natural Resources and Loss of Local Livelihoods

By: Green Union Indonesia (Sarekat Hijau Indonesia)

Indonesia has all the prerequisites to be a rich nation, with extensive natural resources such as minerals, coal, forests, ocean and coastal assets, farm land and plantations which are the lifeblood of local communities and the source of prosperity of its people.

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Too much hot air, not enough trust – Day one from the Climate summit

By Barry Coates, Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

Memories of the Copenhagen climate summit are never far from the minds of negotiators at the climate change talks currently being held in Paris. In 2009 the Copenhagen talks collapsed in an atmosphere of political mistrust and mutual blame. It has taken six years to get negotiators back to the point of trying again to sign a global agreement.

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