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National climate policy – 4. United Kingdom

by Kennedy Graham

And what of the UK?

-    In 1990, Britain’s gross emissions were 773 Mt.  New Zealand’s were 60 Mt.

-    In 2011, Britain’s were 550 Mt., a drop of 29%.   New Zealand’s were 76 Mt., an increase of 27%.

-    For 2027, Britain’s are budgeted (in law) to be 390 Mt. on average, and probably less, a drop (from 1990) of 50%.  New Zealand’s are projected to be about 98 Mt. (allowing for some leeway on forestry), an increase of 63%.

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國家氣候變遷政策: 英國

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National Climate Policy – 1. Denmark

by Kennedy Graham

Under the ’92 Framework Convention, all countries are equal, but some are more equal than others.

The CBDR/RC principle seeks to distinguish developed countries from developing, for the first period – as it turns out, from 1992 to 2020.  The principle says that all countries should protect the climate on the basis of equity and in accordance with their common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities.

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國家氣候政策(一):丹麥

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UNDERSTOREY: STAY OR GO?

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UNDERSTOREY: GEIGER COUNTING ON A FUTURE

Australian uranium contaminates Fukushima.  It was not  a natural disaster, but entirely “man-made,” according to an official investigation, damage caused by  “a multitude of errors and wilful negligence that left the Fukushima plant unprepared.”  Worse was to come: “serious deficiencies in the response to the accidents by TEPCO, regulators and the government.”

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The Fukushima Understory - The Aftershocks Keep Coming

Australian uranium contaminates Fukushima.  In this special series, "Beyond Nuclear War and Radioactive Peace," Understorey travels to Fukushima, Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  In this first episode, we ask: what’s it like to be close to a nuclear reactor that’s about to explode?   Why did the Japanese parliament say the Fukushima nuclear disaster was “man-made”?

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Zero Carbon Australia Buildings Plan

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Green Federations / National Parties: 
The Zero Carbon Australia Buildings Plan (ZCA) project is an exciting initiative of Beyond Zero Emissions and the University of Melbourne’s Energy Research Institute. The project is a road map for the transition to a decarbonised Australian economy. The latest and most credible science tell us such a transition is necessary in order to reverse climate disruption. The project draws a blueprint for a zero carbon future for Australia, including a practical plan to fix Australia’s buildings over the next decade. It demonstrates how: All existing buildings can reach zero emissions from their operation within ten years; and Australia can transform its building stock to reduce energy bills, generate renewable energy, add health and comfort to our living spaces, and make our workplaces more productive. While the examples used in the plan are specific to Australia, the concepts are universal, and we hope it will prompt similar thinking and action in countries across the region. Australian Greens International Secretary Bob Hale would be very interested in answering questions or discussing how we can spread this message.

Fossil Fuel Burden on State Coffers

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Green Federations / National Parties: 

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil-fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Risky deep sea well gets NZ EPA go ahead without consent

The New Zealand Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has given oil giant Anadarko the green light to drill an exploratory deep sea oil well offshore from Auckland’s iconic west coast beaches without a consent or public consultation, the Green Party has revealed today.

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